How to Keep Warm when there's No Heating - Survivopedia (2023)

Hey! It’s cold out there!

This always seems to be a shocking revelation when that first chill of autumn comes to call. We understand it’s coming on an intellectual basis, but when it actually hits, we always seem to be surprised. We wake up one morning to find a cold house because we forgot to turn the heat on and all our winter coats are hidden away, where they’re hard to get to.

I guess we could call this one more example of how far modern society is from the basics of survival. We’re so far removed from the necessity of making sure we can survive through the winter, that for most of us, our only preparation for cold times is getting ready for the football season. If the heat actually went out for an extended period of time, most of us wouldn’t know what to do.

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Yesterday I received a reminder of this, as a high school friend up north had re-posted a request for help from a single mother, whose power was out. It was 40 degrees in her house and she was asking if there was a shelter available she could take her kids to. But the sad thing was, she hadn’t even thought about dressing them warmer in the meantime, so they could better handle the cold.

While this might be a rather extreme example of not knowing how to handle such common things as cold weather, it truly illustrates how far we are from the basics of survival as a society. While those of us who consider ourselves preppers are in much better shape with our survival knowledge, there are still things our ancestors did, for which many of us are unaware and unprepared. Even the way we build our homes is not conducive to a life without all the luxuries that modern society has to offer.

So, what would you do if the power went out and stayed out this winter? How would you stay warm?

Off-Grid Heating

How to Keep Warm when there's No Heating - Survivopedia (1)
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I don’t want to belabor the point, because that’s not really what this article is about, but we all need some alternative means of heating our homes, without electricity. Whether that’s a wood-burning stove or kerosene heaters, we’ve got to have something on-hand and in place to heat at least part of our homes. That’s just about as basic a part of prepping as stockpiling food is.

But what saddens me is how few preppers actually have enough fuel to get through the winter. I’ve seen many a prepper home where they installed a wood-burning stove, but only have a face cord of firewood to burn in it. According to people who regularly heat their homes with wood, it takes four to six full cords of hardwood firewood to make it through winter.

Regardless of what off-grid heating system to opt for, make sure you have enough fuel to make it through the hard times; whatever those hard times might be.

Can You Restock Your Fuel?

Another place where preppers tend to fall short is in ensuring that they have a means to restock their fuel, once they’ve used it up. Even if you do have enough firewood to get you through this winter, what about next? In a long-term survival situation, you might need to harvest enough firewood or other fuel to make it through each winter.

This will be complicated by other people trying to do the same thing. The people who aren’t prepared will be tearing apart abandoned homes, cutting down neighborhood trees, and everything else they can do, just to make it through the first winter. It’s highly unlikely that there will be any firewood available in town, even in the suburbs, to get any of us through a second winter.

You’re going to need some means of harvesting firewood away from town and getting it back home. If we assume that there won’t be any gasoline and we can’t use our cars and trucks to move that wood, it’s going to be extremely hard to harvest that wood, even if it’s only a few miles away.

The other option is to come up with an alternative fuel that can be burned in your wood-burning stove. People have made fireplace logs out of newspaper for years and some enterprising preppers have found ways of adding additional material, such as sawdust and leaves, to that mix. While there won’t be any newspapers being delivered in a post-disaster world, there will be lots of paper that can be scavenged, allowing you to come up with your own brand of off-grid imitation firewood. But I’d start now so that you have the recipe and mixing equipment ready.

But again, that’s not really the subject of this article.

Expanding Your Ability to Keep Warm

While our ancestors had fireplaces or wood-burning stoves to warm their homes, that wasn’t all they did. Most homes only had one fireplace to produce heat. If they had a fireplace and a wood stove in the kitchen, that family was very well off indeed.

Yet they managed to find ways of keeping themselves warm through the winter, even though their homes weren’t thermostatically controlled to a nice comfortable 75°F. The same methods would probably work for us, even though we might need some modifications to use them in our modern homes. What’s even better, is that we can use them now, reducing our energy costs, without having to wait for a power outage to come.

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Only Use Part of the Home

How to Keep Warm when there's No Heating - Survivopedia (2)

Homes today are much more complex than they were 100 years ago. What we consider to be an average suburban home would probably have been thought of as a mansion, or nearly so, with the exception of the fancy woodwork that mansions had back then. But as far as size and the number of rooms we have, they would definitely be impressed.

But all those rooms are a problem. By and large, any fireplace or wood-burning stove is a one-room apparatus, which can only heat one room of your home. The heat doesn’t travel well from there to any adjacent rooms, simply because of the small openings that are our doorways.

Fortunately, even if has happened accidentally, newer homes are going with more of an “open living” concept, where the living room, dining room, kitchen, and family room are all open to one another. This makes it possible for heat to radiate around the entire living area of the home, warming it. That doesn’t help the bedrooms, but if you have a newer home with this open living sort of design, you can count on having at least some heat throughout the living area of your home.

So what about the rest of the home? Close it off and don’t use it. While all those rooms are nice to have, you can all sleep on the living room floor in a pinch. If it’s actually that cold, then don’t even try to warm the bedrooms; take advantage of the warmer part of the house.

Heat by Convection

Another thing their home designs did much more effectively than ours was to heat by convection. Yes, our ancestors were way ahead of us on that one, even though their homes were much smaller and simpler than ours.

What I’m specifically referring to here is having a sleeping loft, open to the room below. Since heat rises, that would be the warmest part of any home, regardless of how well the fireplace worked and how cold it got outside. Usually, the kids slept in that loft, although in some families, everyone did.

The open home concept I was talking about a moment ago can help here if you have a two-story home that’s designed for it. cathedral ceilings and balconies allow the heat from the fireplace to rise, warming the second-story room, assuming that people remember to leave the doors open.

But what can you do, if you don’t have an open second floor like that? One thing is to open up the stairway, rather than having one that’s closed off. An open stairway will allow more air movement between the floors, getting some of that heat upstairs. Just make sure you’re not removing a load-bearing wall before you start cutting things out.

Another good way to get heat upstairs is to cut vents between the first floor of the home and the second. A simple hole through the upstairs floor, covered by a grating, will allow heat to rise, without disturbing the use of the home.

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If the home has a partial second floor, with dormers, it’s quite possible that there is space under the eaves, which is over the first floor and not being used by the second floor. In that case, that area can be easily turned into a vent, cutting vents into the floor and the wall of the upstairs room. Just be sure to insulate the rafters, which probably aren’t already insulated.

Heat Yourself Twice

How to Keep Warm when there's No Heating - Survivopedia (3)

There’s a reason why felling trees and cutting wood was a wintertime activity. Not only were farmers too busy to cut wood during crop times, but cutting wood in the wintertime served to warm them twice, once while cutting the wood and the second time when they were burning it.

Our modern sedentary lifestyle doesn’t lend itself to keeping ourselves warm. We’d all be a lot better off if we were a bit more active. That’s especially true during cold weather when many people struggle to feel warm. Save those heavy physical projects for the winter and do them then, when you won’t procrastinating about them because of how hot it is.

Wear Warm Clothing

As I said about the woman in the introduction, this one is so obvious that it shouldn’t have to be mentioned; but I’ll mention it anyway. The truth is, we’re all so used to central heating keeping us warm, that we don’t bother with warm clothing.

I’ve got lots of nice sweaters that I don’t use, even in the wintertime, because they’re just too darn hot. While they might feel comfortable outdoors, they sure aren’t when I’m home. So they mostly sit in the dresser, waiting for colder times.

A number of years ago, I lived much farther north, in a home where my office was in an unfinished attic. In the summertime I got a fairly good breeze through the attic, making it bearable and in the wintertime, I used those sweaters. Although I had a kerosene heater in the office, I usually only used it to take off the morning chill; then once the chill was gone, I turned it off. I was comfortable working in that 50° attic, as long as I had a thick sweater on.

Pile on the Blankets and Share Body Heat

How to Keep Warm when there's No Heating - Survivopedia (4)

Speaking of those years living up north, we had a comforter on our bed that seemed to be four inches thick. Actually, it wasn’t. It was a normal comforter, to which had been added two more layers of thick quilt batting and a layer of fake fur. While that sounds a bit strange, it sure was nice on those cold winter nights.

Believe it or not, bed coverings aren’t just for decoration; they’re to keep us warm. If yours aren’t then perhaps you need to pile more on. I never saw a law limiting the number of blankets and comforters that can be put on one bed. Families would do that in the winter and still do in Mexico and other countries where central heating isn’t all that common.

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The other thing they did was to share beds. Now I realize that might be a problem in our current culture, but back then all the kids would usually sleep together so that they could keep each other warm. Mom and dad didn’t sleep on opposite sides of a king-size bed; they cuddled together all night long. Not only did that help keep them warm, but it was also good for their relationship.

Use a Bed Warmer

The old bed warmer was one of mankind’s great inventions. You’ve probably seen one; a copper frying pan with a hinged lid and a long handle. People would use it to warm up the sheets, before sliding between them, making the bed a whole lot more comfortable.

Contrary to popular belief, they didn’t put coals from the fire in the bed warmer. Had they done so, their nice white sheets would have turned black. Rather, they warmed stones in the coals of the fire and then put those coals in the bed warmer, often wrapped in a rag.

If you could find a bed warmer today, you probably wouldn’t want to use it, as it would be an antique. But that’s not to say you can’t make one yourself. All you need is a metal frying pan with a lid; aluminum or copper would be best. Attach a hinge, so that the lid can be opened, without becoming separated from the pan and change the existing handle for a longer one. Most frying panhandles are attached with only one screw, so it really isn’t all that hard to change the handle.

Use a Heat Stone

Speaking of stones, the idea of using stones as a means of portable heat was commonplace in olden times. Specifically, they would use soapstone, warmed in the coals of the fire, and wrapped in a cloth carrier. This could be taken in the wagon, placed under the seat, providing heat while going to town. Between the warm stone under the seat and a blanket across their laps, people were much warmer. Those sitting in the back of the wagon would sit with their backs to the seat so that they could get the advantage of that heat as well.

The soapstone didn’t just stay in the wagon either. When people went to church, they’d bring it in with them, to warm their family pew. Have you ever seen pictures of those old churches whit boxed in pews? That wasn’t for snobbery; that was to help keep the heat in from their soapstone.

If it worked for them, it would work for us as well. I never tried it, but I imagine if I had taken heated soapstone up to my uninsulated and unheated attic office all those years ago, I wouldn’t have needed that kerosene heater. All I would have had to do is put the stone in the well of my desk, and a blanket over my knees. Between that and my sweater, I would have been fine.

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FAQs

How do I keep warm without heating? ›

Keep warm without putting the heating on: how to keep you and your house cosy without central heating
  1. So, what can you do to limit your outgoings and remain toasty?
  2. Make sure you have well insulated curtains/or blinds.
  3. Make sure the floor is covered, too.
  4. Cosy up with a good ol' fashioned hot water bottle.
3 Oct 2022

How do I get warm without anything? ›

Go for a walk or a jog. If it's too cold outside, hit the gym, or just do some jumping jacks, pushups, or other exercises indoors. Not only will it warm you up, it helps build and keep your muscles, which also burn calories and make body heat.

How can I stay warm without heating or electric? ›

Layering clothing and using blankets will be one of the easiest ways to ensure you keep warm with no power. Make sure to remember your feet, hands and head as those areas can lose heat quickly! Dressing gowns will become your new best friend.

How can I keep my house warm in winter without electricity? ›

How to Keep Your House Warm Without Electricity: 15 Easy Tips
  1. Block Up Cracks and Crevices. ...
  2. Wear Plenty of Layers. ...
  3. Use Candles (Safely) ...
  4. Have Blinds Open during the Day and Shut at Night. ...
  5. Keep Yourself and your Pets Warm with Blankets. ...
  6. Grab Your Sleeping Bags. ...
  7. Do Some Exercise. ...
  8. Consume Warm Drinks.

How can I heat my room cheaply? ›

The cheapest way to heat a room
  1. Gas central heating. There's a good reason why many houses have gas central heating installed – it's the cheapest option. ...
  2. Oil-filled heaters. ...
  3. Electric heaters. ...
  4. Change your energy supplier or tariff. ...
  5. Reflect the heat. ...
  6. Fit thermal curtains. ...
  7. Bubble wrap on your windows. ...
  8. Insulate your attic.

How do you live in a cold house? ›

If it's very cold, set it to stay on longer, rather than turning the thermostat up. Close the curtains when it's getting dark. Tuck them behind the radiator and shut the doors to rooms you use most to keep the heat in. Stay warm with a hot water bottle or electric blanket – but don't use both at the same time.

How can I stay warm without a blanket? ›

13 Tips for Staying Warm Without Turning Up the Heat
  1. Dress in Layers. ...
  2. Wear Thick Socks or Slippers. ...
  3. Use the Oven and Stove for Cooking. ...
  4. Leave the Oven Open After Baking. ...
  5. Enjoy a Cup of Soup. ...
  6. Drink Warm Beverages. ...
  7. Use a Humidifier. ...
  8. Reverse the Ceiling Fan.
17 Jun 2021

What should you do when it is too cold? ›

16 tips on how to stay warm in cold weather
  1. If you can, turn the heat up if you're still cold.
  2. Try to keep the temperature consistent. ...
  3. Keep the heat in overnight. ...
  4. Wrap up in bed. ...
  5. Dress in layers to keep warm. ...
  6. Put blankets around your home. ...
  7. Use hot water bottles, electric blankets and wheat bags.
6 Feb 2018

What is the cheapest way to stay warm in the winter? ›

8 Ways to Keep Warm on a Budget
  1. 1) Block Out Draughts. The best way to keep your home warm without turning up the heating is to stop the current heat from escaping. ...
  2. 2) Use Your Curtains. ...
  3. 3) Lay Down Rugs. ...
  4. 4) Layering Up. ...
  5. 5) Socks & Slippers. ...
  6. 6) Hot Food & Hot Drinks. ...
  7. 7) Hot Water Bottles. ...
  8. 8) Keep Moving.
13 Mar 2020

How do homeless people survive winter? ›

Stockpile blankets and sleeping bags.

These will be essential when you are sleeping outside, but can also keep you warm in a car or in a more protected shelter. Wrap yourself with blankets and then get into the sleeping bag for maximum warmth.

How can I make myself warm in bed? ›

How to Keep Warm in Bed – 8 Top Tips
  1. Get Your Room Temperature Right. Let's get the most important tip out the way first! ...
  2. Get Cosy in Extra Layers. Have you got the right room temperature, but you're still too chilly? ...
  3. Warm PJ's. ...
  4. Take a bath. ...
  5. Wear Bed socks. ...
  6. Dig Out Your Hot water bottle. ...
  7. Enjoy a Hot drink.

What do you do when you lose your heat in the winter? ›

What to Do If You Lose Heat in Winter
  1. Pick a Room and Stick Together. ...
  2. Bundle up and Break Out Other Heating Options. ...
  3. Eliminate Drafts as Best as You Can. ...
  4. Don't Wait—Call for Furnace Repair Service Right Away.
19 Feb 2019

How do people survive in a power outage in the winter? ›

Winter Power Outage Tips & Tricks to Stay Warm
  1. Prepare an Emergency Kit. ...
  2. Stock Up on Food & Water. ...
  3. Get Ready for Power Surges. ...
  4. Use Crayons in Lieu of Candles. ...
  5. Bring Solar Lights Inside. ...
  6. Keep the Freezer Closed (Leverage Cold Weather) ...
  7. Use Your Car to Charge Devices. ...
  8. Store Hand Warmers.
27 Dec 2021

Can one candle heat up room? ›

Short version: To heat a room, you need 20 candles. According to research, the heating power of one candle is 80W. Therefore 20 candles are about the equivalent of one 1600W space heater. A candle heat source of 1600W combined is able to heat a room thoroughly.

Will boiling water heat a room? ›

So boiling water will heat the room more slowly than simply turning on the gas stove. That said, there is a way in which boiling water might feel like it heats the room faster: it increases the humidity in the room. Increased humidity inhibits evaporation of sweat and makes a room feel hotter even when it isn't.

How can you produce heat without electricity or fire? ›

Here's six techniques to create heat in the absence of electricity or fire:
  1. Insulate your body.
  2. Insulate your environment.
  3. Keep moving.
  4. Light a candle.
  5. Use a gas stove.
  6. Take advantage of the sun.
27 May 2022

How can I add heat to a room? ›

10 Cheap Ways To Heat A Room
  1. Use A Small Space Heater. GiveBest Portable Electric Space Heater. ...
  2. Try Insulated Curtains. ...
  3. Apply Heat Under The Covers. ...
  4. Consider A Heated Blanket. ...
  5. Wrap Yourself In A Blanket Scarf. ...
  6. Apply A Door Draft Stopper. ...
  7. Cover Bare Floors With A Rug. ...
  8. Hang A Shelf Above A Radiator.
3 Oct 2020

How can I heat a small room without electricity? ›

How to Heat a Room Without Electricity
  1. Close Off Rooms that You Don't Use. ...
  2. Open Your Curtains During the Day. ...
  3. Use Fans to Circulate Warm Air Upward. ...
  4. Install Storm Windows. ...
  5. Insulate Your Windows. ...
  6. Keep Your Water Heater Well-Maintained. ...
  7. Insulate Your Pipes. ...
  8. Consider Purchasing a Gas Generator.

What is the cheapest form of heating? ›

Gas boiler

It's not as cost-effective without solar panels, but a gas boiler is still the cheapest way to heat your home – though that's set to change soon, with the cost of gas rising more than twice as quickly as electricity.

What happens to a house with no heat? ›

Even homes with the best insulation will freeze inside if they go long enough without heat. And most plumbing lines are located in walls, which promotes even faster freezing of the pipes. Even slightly freezing temperatures will cause pipes to shatter or split.

Can sleeping in a cold room make you sick? ›

You can't get sick from being cold in general, whether you are outside or inside,” Fecher says.

Can cold house make you sick? ›

Cold air inflames lungs and inhibits circulation, increasing the risk of respiratory conditions, such as asthma attacks or symptoms, worsening of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and infection.

How cold is too cold to sleep in your house? ›

Blood vessels become constricted, breathing becomes shallow and it puts extra pressure on our cardiovascular system to get our body temperatures regulated again, she adds. If your bedroom temperature is lower than 60° F, it's too cold.

What is the warmest bedding? ›

Fabric: The easiest way to stay warm in the wintertime is to choose sheets that are made from flannel or fleece, both of which are very effective at keeping you nice and cozy. That said, cotton bedding that's heavier in weight can also be a good option.

How do I prepare for winter 2022? ›

We've asked experts to share some actions to take right now to prepare for the coming months.
  1. Get on top of any debts. ...
  2. Review your expenses and budget. ...
  3. Compare bills. ...
  4. Check your tax breaks. ...
  5. Insulate your home. ...
  6. Take advantage of loyalty schemes. ...
  7. Change to more energy efficient lightbulbs. ...
  8. Cancel those subscriptions.
25 Aug 2022

How do you stay warm while sitting? ›

If you're sitting down, a shawl or blanket will provide a lot of warmth.

What temperature is too cold for humans? ›

Hypothermia (hi-poe-THUR-me-uh) occurs as your body temperature falls below 95 F (35 C).

Can rugs make a room warmer? ›

In regions where winters are extreme and/or last for a long time, rugs are one of the most trusted ways to keep the room warm, besides beautifying the space. In fact, you can place an area rug for home if your floor always feels cold or even if you simply want to feel extra warmth under your feet all the time.

How do you stay warm while sleeping on the street? ›

Tips for keeping warm:

Wear warm clothes – layers are best because they help to trap the heat. Wear hat and gloves – It is a myth that you lose most of your body heat through your head however you WILL lose heat from any part of your body that is exposed.

How can I keep my car warm overnight? ›

How to stay warm in your car during extreme winter weather
  1. Have thermal blankets ready to go. ...
  2. Stow wool blankets if you have the space. ...
  3. Store warm clothing in the car. ...
  4. Keep hand warmers in the glove box. ...
  5. Keep an eye on your fuel. ...
  6. Install a heated car seat cushion. ...
  7. Bring an insulated mug to keep your drink warm for longer.
3 Feb 2022

Do more blankets make you warmer? ›

One blanket will trap plenty of hot air between itself and your body, but another blanket will create another layer of warmth. This will give you plenty of heat in the winter.

Why is my boyfriend so warm in bed? ›

For starters, men tend to run hotter than women as a result of having more muscle mass, which generates more heat than fat. "Body temperature is a reflection of metabolic rate — if somebody pushes a lot of weights they will push their basal metabolic rate up and run hot," Professor Dawson told 9Honey Coach.

Is sleeping naked warmer in winter? ›

If you wear long underwear inside your house in winter, you will feel warmer than if you walk around the house naked. That is why wearing long underwear in a sleeping bag will keep you warmer than sleeping naked. It's another layer of insulation that traps hot air and keeps it close to your body.

What is the cheapest way to stay warm in the winter? ›

8 Ways to Keep Warm on a Budget
  1. 1) Block Out Draughts. The best way to keep your home warm without turning up the heating is to stop the current heat from escaping. ...
  2. 2) Use Your Curtains. ...
  3. 3) Lay Down Rugs. ...
  4. 4) Layering Up. ...
  5. 5) Socks & Slippers. ...
  6. 6) Hot Food & Hot Drinks. ...
  7. 7) Hot Water Bottles. ...
  8. 8) Keep Moving.
13 Mar 2020

How can I heat my room cheaply? ›

The cheapest way to heat a room
  1. Gas central heating. There's a good reason why many houses have gas central heating installed – it's the cheapest option. ...
  2. Oil-filled heaters. ...
  3. Electric heaters. ...
  4. Change your energy supplier or tariff. ...
  5. Reflect the heat. ...
  6. Fit thermal curtains. ...
  7. Bubble wrap on your windows. ...
  8. Insulate your attic.

How do I make emergency heat? ›

Metal Can, Alcohol and Toilet Paper Emergency Heater

Just put a roll of toilet paper into a tin can. Pour the alcohol over the toilet paper, so it is just saturated. Then light the alcohol on fire. The alcohol is the fuel, and the toilet paper is like a wick in a candle.

Can one candle heat up room? ›

Short version: To heat a room, you need 20 candles. According to research, the heating power of one candle is 80W. Therefore 20 candles are about the equivalent of one 1600W space heater. A candle heat source of 1600W combined is able to heat a room thoroughly.

Will boiling water heat a room? ›

So boiling water will heat the room more slowly than simply turning on the gas stove. That said, there is a way in which boiling water might feel like it heats the room faster: it increases the humidity in the room. Increased humidity inhibits evaporation of sweat and makes a room feel hotter even when it isn't.

Can rugs make a room warmer? ›

In regions where winters are extreme and/or last for a long time, rugs are one of the most trusted ways to keep the room warm, besides beautifying the space. In fact, you can place an area rug for home if your floor always feels cold or even if you simply want to feel extra warmth under your feet all the time.

How can I add heat to a room? ›

10 Cheap Ways To Heat A Room
  1. Use A Small Space Heater. GiveBest Portable Electric Space Heater. ...
  2. Try Insulated Curtains. ...
  3. Apply Heat Under The Covers. ...
  4. Consider A Heated Blanket. ...
  5. Wrap Yourself In A Blanket Scarf. ...
  6. Apply A Door Draft Stopper. ...
  7. Cover Bare Floors With A Rug. ...
  8. Hang A Shelf Above A Radiator.
3 Oct 2020

How can I heat a small room without electricity? ›

How to Heat a Room Without Electricity
  1. Close Off Rooms that You Don't Use. ...
  2. Open Your Curtains During the Day. ...
  3. Use Fans to Circulate Warm Air Upward. ...
  4. Install Storm Windows. ...
  5. Insulate Your Windows. ...
  6. Keep Your Water Heater Well-Maintained. ...
  7. Insulate Your Pipes. ...
  8. Consider Purchasing a Gas Generator.

What is the cheapest form of heating? ›

Gas boiler

It's not as cost-effective without solar panels, but a gas boiler is still the cheapest way to heat your home – though that's set to change soon, with the cost of gas rising more than twice as quickly as electricity.

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